Sitdown Up North

Sitdown Up North
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An Autobiography 2
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Artikel-Nr:
9781925283891
Veröffentl:
2018
Seiten:
240
Autor:
Ted Egan
eBook Typ:
EPUB
eBook Format:
Reflowable
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Ted Egan was born in Melbourne and spent his first sixteen years there, described in his The Paperboy's War.Since 1949 he has lived and worked in the Northern Territory, now based in Alice Springs, performing, writing, singing and recording his own songs, and collecting those of others.He speaks two Aboriginal languages, and often lectures on Aboriginal language and issues. He is an inaugural Life Member of the Australian Stockman's Hall of Fame. In 1991 he was awarded the Order of Australia for 'services to the Aboriginal People, and for an ongoing and significant contribution to Australia's literary heritage through song and verse'. He was at one time a member of the Prime Minister's National Reconciliation Council.Author of numerous books, his last was Justice All Their Own, an account of the clash of cultures when Aboriginals speared a group of Japanese fishermen and a white policeman to death in the early 1930s.Ted Egan, 17, was going to stop over en route to Brazil, but he still lives in the Territory.Sitdown Up North scatters our pre-conceptions of what Territorians are like. Egan's palette goes beyond red ochre and sky blue. There are nut-brown metho-drinking scholars, a white man whose first language is Cantonese, a dusky mother who pursued her 'stolen children' and an ebony-coloured son patiently decorating his revered father's bones in rainbows of intricate design, for starters. A love of song tuned his ear superbly to the vagaries of Territorians' speech.There's the ABC we expect of any good Outback yarn Adventure, Brawls and Close-shaves. But more than that ...The author's work gave him a rare, privileged position from which to watch change coming over the land. His acquaintanceship has been extraordinarily wide and diverse: bums and bureaucrats, elders and activists, publicians and politicians, stockmen and nurses, all hues, young 'uns and flourbags, Lingari, Coombs, Roberts, Whitlam. Good listener, insatiably curious, historian, Ted Egan knows his Territory. Where the record isn't pretty, he doesn't flinch. Commitment to a fair go, quick sympathies for the oppressed, honest recall of youth and his love of the place and all its people make Sitdown ... moving autobiography, refreshing history and an exotic tour of one of the world's least understood places. 'A bloody good yarn ... a rambunctious, insightful and compelling account of Territory frontier life' - Tim Bowden' ... lucky enough to witness the Territory during one of its most interesting stages. He happened to be in the right place at the right time in some cases the wrong time.' - Les Hiddens
Ted Egan was born in Melbourne and spent his first sixteen years there, described in his The Paperboy's War.Since 1949 he has lived and worked in the Northern Territory, now based in Alice Springs, performing, writing, singing and recording his own songs, and collecting those of others.He speaks two Aboriginal languages, and often lectures on Aboriginal language and issues. He is an inaugural Life Member of the Australian Stockman's Hall of Fame. In 1991 he was awarded the Order of Australia for 'services to the Aboriginal People, and for an ongoing and significant contribution to Australia's literary heritage through song and verse'. He was at one time a member of the Prime Minister's National Reconciliation Council.Author of numerous books, his last was Justice All Their Own, an account of the clash of cultures when Aboriginals speared a group of Japanese fishermen and a white policeman to death in the early 1930s.Ted Egan, 17, was going to stop over en route to Brazil, but he still lives in the Territory.Sitdown Up North scatters our pre-conceptions of what Territorians are like. Egan's palette goes beyond red ochre and sky blue. There are nut-brown metho-drinking scholars, a white man whose first language is Cantonese, a dusky mother who pursued her 'stolen children' and an ebony-coloured son patiently decorating his revered father's bones in rainbows of intricate design, for starters. A love of song tuned his ear superbly to the vagaries of Territorians' speech.There's the ABC we expect of any good Outback yarn Adventure, Brawls and Close-shaves. But more than that ...The author's work gave him a rare, privileged position from which to watch change coming over the land. His acquaintanceship has been extraordinarily wide and diverse: bums and bureaucrats, elders and activists, publicians and politicians, stockmen and nurses, all hues, young 'uns and flourbags, Lingari, Coombs, Roberts, Whitlam. Good listener, insatiably curious, historian, Ted Egan knows his Territory. Where the record isn't pretty, he doesn't flinch. Commitment to a fair go, quick sympathies for the oppressed, honest recall of youth and his love of the place and all its people make Sitdown ... moving autobiography, refreshing history and an exotic tour of one of the world's least understood places. 'A bloody good yarn ... a rambunctious, insightful and compelling account of Territory frontier life' - Tim Bowden' ... lucky enough to witness the Territory during one of its most interesting stages. He happened to be in the right place at the right time in some cases the wrong time.' - Les Hiddens

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