Life, Death, and Meaning
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Life, Death, and Meaning

Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions
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ISBN-13:
9781442201712
Seiten:
472
Autor:
David Benatar
eBook Typ:
Adobe Digital Editions
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses. While many philosophers in the 'continental tradition'_those known as 'existentialists'_have engaged these issues at length and often with great popular appeal, English-speaking philosophers have had relatively little to say on these important questions. Yet, the methodology they bring to philosophical questions can, and occasionally has, been applied usefully to 'existential' questions. This volume draws together a representative sample of primarily English-speaking philosophers' reflections on life's big questions, divided into six sections, covering (1) the meaning of life, (2) creating people, (3) death, (4) suicide, (5) immortality, and (6) optimism and pessimism. These key readings are supplemented with helpful introductions, study questions, and suggestions for further reading, making the material accessible and interesting for students. In short, the book provides a singular introduction to the way that philosophy has dealt with the big questions of life that we are all tempted to ask.
Chapter 1 Preface
Chapter 2 Introduction

Part 3 Chapter 1: The Meaning of Life

Chapter 4 The Meaning of Life

Chapter 5 The Absurd

Chapter 6 'Nothing Matters'

Chapter 7 Philosophy and the Meaning of Life

Chapter 8 Philosophy and the Meaning of Life

Chapter 9 The Meanings of Life

Part 10 Chapter 2: Creating People

Chapter 11 Whether Causing Someone to Exist Can Benefit This Person

Chapter 12 Why Not Let Life Become Extinct?

Chapter 13 On Becoming Extinct

Chapter 14 Why it is Better Never to Come into Existence

Part 15 Chapter 3: Death

Chapter 16 How to be Dead and Not Care: A Defense of Epicurus

Chapter 17 The Misfortunes of the Dead

Chapter 18 Annihilation

Chapter 19 Some Puzzles About the Evil of Death

Chapter 20 Pre-Vital and Post-Mortem Non-Existence

Chapter 21 Why Death is not Bad for the One who Died

Part 22 Chapter 4: Suicide

Chapter 23 Of Suicide

Chapter 24 Suicide and Duty

Chapter 25 Suicide: A Qualified Defence

Part 26 Chapter 5: Immortality

Chapter 27 Immortality: A letter

Chapter 28 The Makropulos case: reflections on the tedium of immortality

Chapter 29 Why Immortality is Not So Bad

Chapter 30 From here to eternity: Is it good to live forever?

Part 31 Chapter 6: Optimism and Pessimism

Chapter 32 Optimism

Chapter 33 The Consolations of Optimism

Chapter 34 The sad truth: optimism, pessimism, and pragmatism

Chapter 35 On the Suffering of the World