Popular Theater and Society in Tsarist Russia
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Popular Theater and Society in Tsarist Russia

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ISBN-13:
9780520925878
Seiten:
364
Autor:
E. Anthony Swift
Serie:
44, Studies on the History of Society and Culture
eBook Typ:
PDF
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

This is the most comprehensive study available of the popular theater that developed during the last decades of tsarist Russia. Swift examines the origins and significance of the new "people's theaters" that were created for the lower classes in St. Petersburg and Moscow between 1861 and 1917. His extensively researched study, full of anecdotes from the theater world of the day, shows how these people's theaters became a major arena in which the cultural contests of late imperial Russia were played out and how they contributed to the emergence of an urban consumer culture during this period of rapid social and political change.



Swift illuminates many aspects of the story of these popular theaters—the cultural politics and aesthetic ambitions of theater directors and actors, state censorship politics and their role in shaping the theatrical repertoire, and the theater as a vehicle for social and political reform. He looks at roots of the theaters, discusses specific theaters and performances, and explores in particular how popular audiences responded to the plays.
This is the most comprehensive study available of the popular theater that developed during the last decades of tsarist Russia. Swift examines the origins and significance of the new "people's theaters" that were created for the lower classes in St. Petersburg and Moscow between 1861 and 1917. His extensively researched study, full of anecdotes from the theater world of the day, shows how these people's theaters became a major arena in which the cultural contests of late imperial Russia were played out and how they contributed to the emergence of an urban consumer culture during this period of rapid social and political change.


Swift illuminates many aspects of the story of these popular theaters—the cultural politics and aesthetic ambitions of theater directors and actors, state censorship politics and their role in shaping the theatrical repertoire, and the theater as a vehicle for social and political reform. He looks at roots of the theaters, discusses specific theaters and performances, and explores in particular how popular audiences responded to the plays.
List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Note on Transliteration and Dates

Introduction



Chapter One: The Urban Theatrical Landscape

Chapter Two: People’s Theater and Cultural Politics

Chapter Three: Censorship and Repertoire

Chapter Four: Theater, Temperance, and Popular Culture

Chapter Five: Workers’ Theater, Proletarian Culture, and Respectability

Chapter Six: The People at the Theater: Audience Reception

Conclusion



Epilogue

Appendix of Titles

Notes

Bibliography

Index