An Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk

An Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk
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Containing a Description of the Towns, Villages, and Hamlets, With the Foundations of Monasteries, Churches, Chapels, Chantries, and Other Religious Buildings
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Artikel-Nr:
9780259678793
Veröffentl:
2017
Seiten:
0
Autor:
Francis Blomefield
eBook Typ:
PDF
Kopierschutz:
NO DRM
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Whilst the greatest effort has been made to ensure the quality of this text, due to the historical nature of this content, in some rare cases there may be minor issues with legibility. Humiltart, Humilyerd, now Humble-yard hundred, takes its name from a valley in the parish pf Swerdesfon, where the hundred court was anciently kept, which in evidences still retains the name of Hvmble-yerd, the low yard or court: it makes up exactly the whole deanery called by the same name, and paid to the ancient task or tenths oil. Is. clear. It is bounded on the east with the hundred of Henstede, on the north with the county of the city of Norwich; on the west with the hundred of Forehoe, and on the south with the hundred ofDepwade: there is no town in it which holds a weekly market at this time, it being so near the city of Norwich, that hath totally swallowed up all profits that could accrue to any village in so small a distance. The fee of this hundred was in the Crown, upon Earl Ralphs forfeiture in the Conquerors time, before which it belonged to the manor of Hethersete. In Henry the Thirds time it was worth 12. perannum, when it was farmed by William de St. Omer. In Edward the Firsts time Nic. de Castello or Castle farmed it, and Edward III. conveyed it in exchange to John de Clavering and his heirs; but it afterwards reverted and continued in the Crown till James I. granted it to Sir Charles Cornzmleis, Knt. to be held at the rent of ll. 6 s.id. ob. q.during the lives of Charles Cornwaeis, Esq. eldest son of Sir William Cornwaleis, Knt. Tho. Cornwaleis, Esq. eldest son of the said Charles, and Thomas Cornwaleis, son.of the said Sir William. Humble-Yard Deanery Is in the archdeaconry of Norfolk, and at the time of the 2 Vo;;- zeich taxation had 23 parishes in it, and the annual profit to its rural dean was taxed at26s. 8 d.The following deans were all collated by the several Bishops of the see.1256, John Ordermer. sr rrr or 1312, John de Chetestan. loOUii) 1320, Ric. Umfrey. 1333, Roger de Ayremine. 1337, John de North Kilesey; he resigned ihe same year to Rich. leGrage of Barew, who died in 1341, and was succeeded by Ric. de Normandeby, who resigned the n
Humiltart, Humilyerd, now Humble-yard hundred, takes its name from a valley in the parish pf Swerdesfon, where the hundred court was anciently kept, which in evidences still retains the name of Hvmble-yerd, the low yard or court: it makes up exactly the whole deanery called by the same name, and paid to the ancient task or tenths oil. Is. clear. It is bounded on the east with the hundred of Henstede, on the north with the county of the city of Norwich; on the west with the hundred of Forehoe, and on the south with the hundred ofDepwade: there is no town in it which holds a weekly market at this time, it being so near the city of Norwich, that hath totally swallowed up all profits that could accrue to any village in so small a distance. The fee of this hundred was in the Crown, upon Earl Ralphs forfeiture in the Conquerors time, before which it belonged to the manor of Hethersete. In Henry the Thirds time it was worth 12. perannum, when it was farmed by William de St. Omer. In Edward the Firsts time Nic. de Castello or Castle farmed it, and Edward III. conveyed it in exchange to John de Clavering and his heirs; but it afterwards reverted and continued in the Crown till James I. granted it to Sir Charles Cornzmleis, Knt. to be held at the rent of ll. 6 s.id. ob. q.during the lives of Charles Cornwaeis, Esq. eldest son of Sir William Cornwaleis, Knt. Tho. Cornwaleis, Esq. eldest son of the said Charles, and Thomas Cornwaleis, son.of the said Sir William. Humble-Yard Deanery Is in the archdeaconry of Norfolk, and at the time of the 2 Vo;;- zeich taxation had 23 parishes in it, and the annual profit to its rural dean was taxed at26s. 8 d.The following deans were all collated by the several Bishops of the see.1256, John Ordermer. sr rrr or 1312, John de Chetestan. loOUii) 1320, Ric. Umfrey. 1333, Roger de Ayremine. 1337, John de North Kilesey; he resigned ihe same year to Rich. leGrage of Barew, who died in 1341, and was succeeded by Ric. de Normandeby, who resigned the next year to John Backworth. vol. v.

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